South Shore Dancers
April 2018

SSD DIRECTORS
Martine Anderson
Laurie Cavanaugh
Steve Cavanaugh
Gene Cobb
Kevin O’Brien
Marie Osterland
Tom Osterland
Joan Paquette
Sara StOurs
Karen Troupe
Roger Troupe

OFFICERS
President
    Tom Osterland
Chairman
    Roger Troupe
Treasurer
    Sara StOurs
Recording Secretary
    Karen Troupe
Corresponding Secretary
    Martine Anderson
Publicity
    Laurie Cavanaugh
Property Administrator
    Joan Paquette
Contract Administrator
    Kevin O’Brien

Webmaster
    Roger Troupe

April in Paris – April 14th

            contributed by Roger Troupe

This month, on our year of "Dancing around the World", we travel to La Ville Lumière (the City of Light), the home of la Tour Eiffel (the Eiffel Tower) and Musée du Louvre (Museum of Louvre) or more commonly ("the Louvre".) This is, of course Paris, France. Why is Paris referred to as "the City of Light?"… because of its leading role during the Age of Enlightenment, and more literally because Paris was one of the first European cities to adopt gas street lighting.

The Eiffel Tower was built for the 1889 Paris Exposition and was not intended to be permanent. It was going to be demolished in 1909, but was saved because it was repurposed as a giant radio antenna. The Louvre was originally built as a fortress in 1190, but was reconstructed in the 16th century to serve as a royal palace. It continued expansion over the years. In 1793, Louis XIV moved the royal residence to Versailles, and the Louvre became an art museum, exhibiting the royal collection and artifacts. Now you have enough Paris information to hold your own at the cocktail party.

At 7:30 PM Lestyn Gilmore will start us off with a Foxtrot lesson. Then, at 8:00 PM, Lestyn will switch hats and provide us with three hours of the best of ballroom, Latin, swing, a bit of country and possibly some dance selections with a French flavour.

So, dress informally and join us for an enjoyable evening of dancing, socializing and celebrating La Ville Lumière. We’ll have our usual line dances, ladies choices, two mixers, dance hosts and maybe a dance hostess to provide dancing opportunities for everyone. There will be hot coffee, water for tea and plenty of ice and water and the always impressive snack and sweets table. Contributions to this table are appreciated.

Admission is $10.00 for SSD and USA Dance members, with advance reservation and $12.00 for non-members and members without advance reservations. As of this writing, there are plenty of tickets available. For reservations, call Tom at 781-659-4703 or email us at tickets@southshoredancers.org.

A Celtic Gala ... and the End of Winter!

            contributed by Roger Troupe

With the evening's turnout, it was quite obvious that dancers were ready to be done with this New England winter with its multiple nor'easters and get out and DANCE!Our "trip" to the land of the Celts began with a very nice Waltz figure, presented by Audrey Jean with the assistance of her husband Tony. Was this figure a success? Just ask all of the dancers that incorporated it into their waltzes throughout the evening.

For the next 3 hours, Lestyn Gilmore kept the dance floor comfortably full with the best of ballroom, swing, Latin, mixers, and even a few country music selections. For the first line dance of the evening, Steve Cavanaugh taught a definitely Celtic inspired line dance. Well, it started out as a line dance, but then Steve threw everyone a "curve" and turned it into a "double circle" dance. After getting the positioning correct, everything fell into place and, by the end… well Look Out Riverdance!

Thanks to Audrey Jean and Tony for the waltz lesson; to Steve for the line dance; to Lestyn for the music; to all those who attended; to those who contributed to the snack and sweets table and to the dance hosts and hostess for the evening.

History of the Foxtrot (thanks to Wikipedia)

The dance was premiered in 1914, quickly catching the eye of the husband and wife duo Vernon and Irene Castle, who lent the dance its signature grace and style. The exact origin of the name of the dance is unclear, although one theory is that it took its name from its popularizer, the vaudeville actor Harry Fox. Two sources credit African American dancers as the source of the Foxtrot: Vernon Castle himself, and dance teacher Betty Lee. Castle saw the dance, which had been danced for some fifteen years at a certain exclusive club.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxtrot#cite_note-2

W.C. Handy ("Father of the Blues") notes in his autobiography that his "The Memphis Blues" was the inspiration for the Foxtrot. During breaks from the fast paced Castle Walk and One-step, Vernon and Irene Castle's music director, James Reese Europe, would slowly play the Memphis Blues. The Castles were intrigued by the rhythm and Jim asked why they didn't create a slow dance to go with it. The Castles introduced what they then called the "Bunny Hug" in a magazine article. Shortly after, they went abroad and, in mid-ocean, sent a wireless to the magazine to change the name of the dance from "Bunny Hug" to the "Foxtrot." It was subsequently standardized by Arthur Murray.

At its inception, the foxtrot was originally danced to ragtime. From the late teens through the 1940s, the foxtrot was certainly the most popular fast dance and the vast majority of records issued during these years were foxtrots. The waltz and tango, while popular, never overtook the foxtrot. Even the popularity of the lindy hop in the 1940s did not affect the foxtrot's popularity, since both could be danced to the same records.

Over time, the foxtrot split into slow and quick versions, referred to as "foxtrot" and "quickstep" respectively. In the slow category, further distinctions exist between the International or English style of the foxtrot and the continuity American style, both built around a slow-quick-quick rhythm at the slowest tempo, and the social American style using a slow-slow-quick-quick rhythm at a somewhat faster pace. In the context of the International Standard category of ballroom dances, for some time the foxtrot was called "Slow Foxtrot", or "Slowfox". These names are still in use, to distinguish from other types of foxtrots.



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